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Asbestos

CSEA members work with or near asbestos frequently, if it is improperly controlled workers can develop asbestos related illnesses.

General Information for Building Occupants

Asbestos in the Workplace

Information for Housekeeping & Maintenance Personnel Who May Disturb Asbestos Containing Building Materials

Working Around Asbestos

For All Other Asbestos Related Concerns

If you suspect that asbestos is being improperly removed from your workplace contact the Asbestos Control Bureau

Contact your OSH Specialist if you need help with an asbestos concern.

For More Information

OSHA’s Asbestos Web-page

Active Intruder (Shooter)

Active Intruder (Shooter) events have very little chance of happening in our workplaces, however it is important for workers and their employers to be prepared in case they do occur. On October 15, 1992, an active intruder entered the Schuyler County Office Building and fatally shot four public employees over child support payments that were being garnered from his wages. The risk factor of being in a position of authority or a perceived position of authority over the public is a known risk factor for workplace violence. Because of this incident and others across the country, New York State Public Employers must have workplace violence prevention and emergency preparedness programs in place.

Click here to download the Active Intruder Fact Sheet

Active Intruder Information

http://www.dhs.gov/active-shooter-preparedness

http://www.fbi.gov/about/partnerships/office-of-partner-engagement/active-shooter-resources

http://www.nypdshield.org/public/

Active Shooter Mitigation and Planning Guide For Employers – NYPD

ISC-Planning-Response-Active-Shooter-Guide

Workplace Violence Prevention Resources

http://www.cseany.org/osh/workplaceviolence

http://www.labor.ny.gov/workerprotection/safetyhealth/DOSH_PESH.shtm

Emergency Action Plan Resources

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/

Emergency Action Plan Template-CDC/NIOSH

http://www.dhses.ny.gov/planning/

All About Bugs

Know Your Predator-All About Bugs

Bugs are becoming more prevalent in our workplaces and more dangerous. From bedbugs to bees, come take a walk on the wild side and learn more about these pesky critters. We’re sure to discuss Lyme disease, Powassan, West Nile and Zika, as well as the potential effects from bee, wasp and hornet stings.

  1. Bedbugs
  2. Know Your Predator
  3. Mosquitoes
  4. Stinging Insects
  5. Ticks and Lyme Disease
Back Injuries

Stop the Pain- Preventing Back Injuries

The most Common injuries to workers are back injuries.Lifting, pulling and pushing objects and persons are often the cause.Learn what can be done to prevent back injuries in your workplace.

Back Injury Awareness

Back Injury Assessment Form

Bloodborne Pathogens
What are bloodborne pathogens?

Bloodborne pathogens are infectious microorganisms in human blood that can cause disease in humans. These pathogens include, but are not limited to, hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Needlesticks and other sharps-related injuries may expose workers to bloodborne pathogens. Workers in many occupations, including first responders, housekeeping personnel in some industries, nurses and other healthcare personnel, all may be at risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens.

Read More: https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/bloodbornepathogens/

Bullying in the Workplace

Best the Bully! Addressing Workplace Bullying

Bullying is detrimental to any workplace, school or organization. It affects people of all ages, their families, and their co-workers. Bullying can cause painful physical and emotional effects and can even lead to suicide. Many cases of bullying often escalate into workplace violence incidents. This program will discuss how to address bullying in the workplace.

  1. Addressing Workplace Bullying-A Union Approach Presentation
  2. Bullying Prevention Fact Sheet
  3. Next-steps
  4. SafeZone-Programs
  5. Bullying-INCIDENT-REPORT-FORM
Carbon Monoxide

Hidden Household Hazards

Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire,  and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

  1. Asbestos for the Home
  2. Carbon Monoxide
  3. Electrical
  4. Emergency Preparedness
  5. Fire Prevention
  6. Home Fall Prevention
  7. House Hold Chemicals
  8. Lead
  9. Mold
  10. Radon
Cold-Related Illnesses

Cold Related Illnesses

Confined Space Entry
COVID-19

Disability Insurance and Workers’ Compensation Resources

COVID-19 and Mental Health

Mental health is a fundamental and essential component of overall health.  An individual’s mental health can impact how they cope with every day stressors as well as situations which may result in emotional trauma.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the novel coronavirus (also called COVID-19) a pandemic.  That designation and the actions put in place to try and reduce the curve (closings of many businesses and schools, social distancing as well as insistence of staying home) have resulted in overwhelming feelings of anxiousness/anxiety, worry and separation.

The 24/7 news cycles which release update upon update, can add to the mounting sense of anxiety felt among children as well as adults.  These are common feelings, even for those not directly impacted.  To help manage and reduce stress, it is important to take time to care for yourself.  The following strategies may be helpful;

  • Take the recommended and necessary precautions to keep you and your family safe
  • Try and limit screen time on electronic devices. Also, try and limit news intake to new information and stick to reliable news sources (there is no benefit to watching the same news over and over)
  • Try and maintain a schedule as close to your overall daily routine (even if some changes are necessary)
  • Don’t completely isolate yourself; even if quarantined, it is beneficial to keep social interactions with friends and family (phone, text messaging, social media, etc.)
  • Try and stay physically active

The following documents are provided for additional information:

Should you or your family member need additional mental health assistance during this difficult time, the following resources may be helpful; 

  • The New York COVID-19 Emotional Support Hotline at 1-844-863-9314
  • Your health insurer’s Mental Health Program (contact number typically on back of insurance card)
    • For NYS Empire Plan 1-877-769-7447 (Beacon Health #3)
  • Network mental health providers through your health insurer that provide telehealth services (through phone or video)
  • Telemedicine program offered through your employer or health plan; services through phone or video
  • Your employer’s Employee Assistance Program
  • SAMHSA – Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Helpline 1-800-985-5990

 

COVID-19 Guidance Documents and Legislation

Crystalline Silica

Crystalline Silica

There are many hazards hidden inside a garage. This workshop will show you how to identify and map garage hazards as well as give you more information on spray booths, common chemicals used in garages and much more. After this workshop, you will never see a garage the same way again!

  1. Crystalline Silica
  2. Hexavalent Chromium
  3. Highway Garage Hazards
Disaster/Emergency Preparedness

Flood & Storm Clean-up Information

Cleaning up after an extreme weather event can be hazardous work.  Below are some resources to help you stay safe and healthy during the flooding and clean-up both at home and on the job.  Safety must remain a priority, especially in emergency situations.  Each employer is responsible for the safety and health of its workers and for providing a safe and healthful workplace.  Employers are required to protect workers from the anticipated hazards associated with the flood response and recovery operations that workers are likely to conduct.

Use This Information To Help Safely Respond To A Severe Weather Event

Information for CSEA members responding to flood affected areas

Working in and Cleaning Up Flooded Buildings

NIEHS Hurricane Sandy Response Page

Protecting Yourself While Helping Others

Protecting Yourself While Removing Post-Disaster Debris from Your Home and Business

OSHA’s Winter Storm Page

OSHA’s Flood Response Page

OSHA’s Hurricane Preparedness and Response Page

Diesel hazards fact sheet (Mt Sinai)

Blood exposure during clean-up (NYCOSH)

Flood health hazards from sewage (NYCOSH)

Hurricane Sandy Clean up Hazards (NYCOSH)

Emergency Response and Preparedness Floods Page; US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Protect Your Property or Business from Disaster Page; US Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA)

A Brief Guide to Mold, Moisture, and Your Home: What to Wear When Cleaning Moldy Areas; US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings; US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

American Red Cross Disaster Relief Page

The 2-1-1 hotline is available to help many New Yorkers find information and resources for hurricane relief efforts, to find 2-1-1 service by county (Please note: 2-1-1 is not available in all counties).

Electrical for the Home

Hidden Household Hazards

Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

Fall Prevention for the Home

Hidden Household Hazards

Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

  1. Asbestos for the Home
  2. Carbon Monoxide
  3. Electrical
  4. Emergency Preparedness
  5. Fire Prevention
  6. Home Fall Prevention
  7. House Hold Chemicals
  8. Lead
  9. Mold
  10. Radon
Fire Prevention

Hidden Household Hazards

Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

Garage Hazards

Garage Hazards

There are many hazards hidden inside a garage. This workshop will show you how to identify and map garage hazards as well as give you more information on spray booths, common chemicals used in garages and much more. After this workshop, you will never see a garage the same way again!

    Heat-Related Illnesses

    Heat-Related Illnesses

    Heat Related Illnesses Fact Sheet

    Heroin/Opioids

    The Heroin/Opioid Epidemic

    The heroin/opioid epidemic is not only affecting our families and communities, but our workplaces as well.  As public employees, hazards associated with opioid use are becoming more common as the epidemic grows. Employers must put protections in place to ensure a safe and healthy workplace against the associated hazards such as exposure to workplace violence and bloodborne pathogens.

    Click here to download  The Heroin Opioid Epidemic Fact Sheet

    Resources for Addiction Help

    More Informational Sources on Heroin/Opioid Use and Addiction

    http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/heroin

    https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/opioids/heroin.html

    http://www.heroin.ws/Heroin-Street-Slang.htm

    Naloxone Information

    https://www.narcan.com

    https://www.drugabuse.gov/related-topics/naloxone

    Bloodborne Pathogen Information

    OSHA-BBP Employer Requirements

    OSHA BBP – PPE-Factsheet

    Hepatitis A, B, C Information

    osha3186Model Exposure Control Plan

    Workplace Violence Prevention Information

    Workplace Violence Annual Requirements

    Hexavalent Chromium

    Garage Hazards

    There are many hazards hidden inside a garage. This workshop will show you how to identify and map garage hazards as well as give you more information on spray booths, common chemicals used in garages and much more. After this workshop, you will never see a garage the same way again!

    Highway Garage Hazards

    Garage Hazards

    There are many hazards hidden inside a garage. This workshop will show you how to identify and map garage hazards as well as give you more information on spray booths, common chemicals used in garages and much more. After this workshop, you will never see a garage the same way again!

    Household Hazards

    Hidden Household Hazards

    Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

    Infectious Diseases

    Infectious Diseases

    CSEA members are frequently y exposed to various diseases because of their work. Health care workers, school employees, sanitation workers and others are regularly placed in environments with infectious conditions. This workshop will discuss occupational diseases such as pandemic flu, MRSA, and other up-and-coming diseases.

    Infectious Diseases Presentation

    Lead

    Hidden Household Hazards

    Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

    1. Asbestos for the Home
    2. Carbon Monoxide
    3. Electrical
    4. Emergency Preparedness
    5. Fire Prevention
    6. Home Fall Prevention
    7. House Hold Chemicals
    8. Lead
    9. Mold
    10. Radon
    Lock-Out Tag-Out

    Controlling Hazardous Energy

    Here’s a shock. Most employers in New York State are not in compliance with the control of hazardous energy regulations. This session will help you to assess your employer’s current Energy Control (Lockout/Tagout) Program. You will be provided with a sample program and templates for equipment-specific energy control procedures.

    Lock-Out Tag-Out Presentation

    Lock-Out Tag-Out Fact Sheet

    View our Webinar on Creating or Revising a Lock-Out/Tag-Out Presentation

    Mold

    Hidden Household Hazards

    Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

    1. Asbestos for the Home
    2. Carbon Monoxide
    3. Electrical
    4. Emergency Preparedness
    5. Fire Prevention
    6. Home Fall Prevention
    7. House Hold Chemicals
    8. Lead
    9. Mold
    10. Radon
    Mosquitoes

    Know Your Predator-All About Bugs

    Bugs are becoming more prevalent in our workplaces and more dangerous. From bedbugs to bees, come take a walk on the wild side and learn more about these pesky critters. We’re sure to discuss Lyme disease, Powassan, West Nile and Zika, as well as the potential effects from bee, wasp and hornet stings.

    1. Bedbugs
    2. Know Your Predator
    3. Mosquitoes
    4. Stinging Insects
    5. Ticks and Lyme Disease
    Musculoskeletal Disorders

    Computer Ergonomics

    Working at a computer workstation that is not properly arranged can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, back injuries and other repetitive strain injuries.  Following simple guidelines and having the right equipment can protect workers from these hazards.

    Recommended Computer Workstation Design

    Computer Workstation Assessment Form

    OSHA’s Computer Workstation Page

    Radon

    Hidden Household Hazards

    Many CSEA members work in a home setting. In addition to daycare workers and those who assist the developmentally disabled, anyone going into a home as part of their job should be aware of the potential hazards in it. Carbon monoxide, mold, radon, fire, and much more will be covered in this comprehensive course. This information is also useful for all of us in our own homes.

    1. Asbestos for the Home
    2. Carbon Monoxide
    3. Electrical
    4. Emergency Preparedness
    5. Fire Prevention
    6. Home Fall Prevention
    7. House Hold Chemicals
    8. Lead
    9. Mold
    10. Radon
    Refuse Collection

    Slow Down to Get Around

    Sanitation workers have a difficult and vital job that keeps our communities clean and safe.  Slow Down to Get Around is our new campaign to help out our brothers and sisters who are getting injured and killed at an alarming rate.  Click here to find out how you can help!SlowDownToGetAround_web

    Safe Patient Handling

    Safe Patient Handling Information

    Injuries from Lifting, moving and repositioning of patients are amongst the most sever and debilitating of all workplace incidents.

    Manual lifting and repositioning of patients is an archaic business practice and is the root-cause of these painful and costly injuries.

    Safe patient handling programs are the solution.  The NYS Veterans Home at Batavia reduced their lost work days by 98% and eliminated mandation and overtime in the process.  For help starting a safe patient handling program contact your OSH specialist for help today!

    Learn How Batavia Solved the Health Care Dilemma

    They’d NEVER go back: The story of how the New York State Veteran’s Home at Batavia solved the health care dilemma by overcoming short staffing, mandatory over-time, high turnover of employees and soaring Workers’ Compensation costs.

    Watch this 15 minute video to find out how.

    More special features and select scenes:

    Batavia’s Administrator talks about when she realized the work done by direct care workers in health care is the same as other industries – like construction.

    Registered Nurse Melissa Rowland talks about how manually lifting patients can cause injury to the worker and patient as well.

    Batavia’s Administrator on the first attempt at implementing a zero lift policy, which failed. What was learned from that experience is that much more is needed to have a successful safe patient handling program.

    Not everyone at the facility was initially convinced BUT were eventually won over!

     

    Safe Patient Handling Fact Sheets

    PATIENTS AND THEIR CAREGIVERS ARE INJURED BY MANUAL LIFTING TASKS

    QUALITY OF CARE FOR PATIENTS IMPROVES FROM SAFE PATIENT HANDLING PROGRAMS

    HEALTHCARE WORK IS CONSISTENTLY AMONG THE MOST HAZARDOUS IN THE NATION

    HEALTHCARE WORK IS AMONG THE MOST HAZARDOUS OCCUPATIONS IN NEW YORK STATE

    INVESTING IN SAFE PATIENT HANDLING AND MOVEMENT IS MONEY IN THE BANK!

    THE COST OF AN INJURY IS FAR GREATER THAN THE COST OF EQUIPMENT

    WE ARE LOSING OUR HEALTHCARE WORKERS

    TECHNIQUES TAUGHT THROUGH BODY MECHANICS TRAINING HAS NOT REDUCED BACK INJURIES AMONG HEALTHCARE WORKERS

    THE EXTREME DEMANDS OF MANUAL LIFTING ARE NEEDLESSLY INJURING OUR HEALTHCARE WORKERS!

    DANGEROUS MANUAL PATIENT TRANSFERS INJURE PATIENTS

    NURSING IS COMPARABLE TO THE MOST PHYSICALLY DEMANDING JOBS

    DANGEROUS MANUAL LIFTING TECHNIQUES ARE STILL A PART OF MANY HEALTHCARE CURRICULUM

     

    Attention Heath Care Workers, CSEA Has Your Back!

    CSEA and The Western New York Council on Safety and Health (WNYCOSH) have spearheaded an effort to protect health care workers in New York by co-founding the NYS Zero Lift Task Force.

    About Us

    Who We Are

    The New York State Zero Lift Task Force is made up of health care workers, administrators, patient advocates, union representatives and safety and health professionals that want to ensure the health and safety of all patients and health care workers in New York State.

    Our Mission Statement

    Our mission is to create a safe environment for patients and health care workers by eliminating strenuous manual lifting tasks involved in transferring and repositioning patients, thus improving the physical well-being of health care workers, significantly reducing negative patient outcomes, improving the financial strength of the health care industry by significantly reducing workers compensation costs, and retaining and recruiting qualified staff.

    NYS P.U.S.H. Campaign

    The NYS P.U.S.H. (Protection Using Safe Handling) Campaign is our educational and awareness program by which we hope to educate New York about the clear benefits of safe patient handling. Through training programs, continuing research, statistical data and legislative efforts, we want New Yorkers to know that safe patient handling programs and legislation will save and protect the future of health care in New York state.

    For more information, please visit zeroliftforNY.org.

    Shift Work

    Confronting Shift-work and Fatigue

    Shift-work is both physically and mentally stressful.This workshop will educate participants on the hazards and stress caused by shift-work. We will discuss the various physiological effects that can result and strategies to address shift-work at the workplace.

    Confronting Shiftwork Presentation

    Shift Work Fact Sheet

    Stinging Insects

    Know Your Predator-All About Bugs

    Bugs are becoming more prevalent in our workplaces and more dangerous. From bedbugs to bees, come take a walk on the wild side and learn more about these pesky critters. We’re sure to discuss Lyme disease, Powassan, West Nile and Zika, as well as the potential effects from bee, wasp and hornet stings.

    1. Bedbugs
    2. Know Your Predator
    3. Mosquitoes
    4. Stinging Insects
    5. Ticks and Lyme Disease
    Stress

    Understanding and Managing Occupational Stress

    Work practices and workplace design can be a source of stress on the job. This workshop will identify sources of stress and provide tips on how to overcome them

    1. Occupational Stress CSEA HS 2018
    2. Shift Work
    3. STRESS factsheet 2016
    Ticks and Lyme Disease

    Know Your Predator-All About Bugs

    Bugs are becoming more prevalent in our workplaces and more dangerous. From bedbugs to bees, come take a walk on the wild side and learn more about these pesky critters. We’re sure to discuss Lyme disease, Powassan, West Nile and Zika, as well as the potential effects from bee, wasp and hornet stings.

    1. Bedbugs
    2. Know Your Predator
    3. Mosquitoes
    4. Stinging Insects
    5. Ticks and Lyme Disease
    Tree Work

    Tree Work and Responding to Severe Weather Events

    Natural disasters and severe weather events are on the rise. Public employees are the first on the scene to keep the roads clear and to clean up the damage. This workshop will explore what employers must and should have ready before a disaster strikes and the dangers of certain tree work that follows.

    1.Chainsaws

    2.FLOOD AFFECTED AREAS-INFO FOR RESPONDERS

    3.Logging PPE

    4.Logging Training Requirements

    Water

    What’s in My Water

    Communities such as Hoosick Falls, NY, and Flint, Ml have suffered serious health effects from contaminated drinking water. This session will discuss what contaminants may be found in your water and the potential health effects of them. Learn how to get testing and what employers are required to do to make sure the water at work is safe.

    1. EPA National Drinking Water Regs
    2. Lead
    3. safe drinking water
    4. Sample Water Testing Report
    5. What Is In My Water
    Work Zone Safety

    Work Zone Safety Information

    Winter Hazards9087_Hockey Ad-1[2]

    Working on or near traveled roads is one of the most dangerous environments for CSEA members.

    Worsening aggressive and distracted driving amplifies the risk that snow plow operators face when they head out in treacherous conditions to clear roads. To build awareness and improve safety, CSEA is working to emphasize the importance of slowing down and being patient around snow plows with a new awareness campaign–“Get the Edge on Ice – Don’t Zone Out.”

     Like us on Facebook www.facebook.com/DontZoneOut

    CSEA video promotions urging drivers to “Get the Edge on Ice – Don’t Zone Out” will be airing on TV stations across the entire state in conjunction with CSEA’s Snow closing announcements.

     

    “Get the Edge on Ice — Don’t Zone Out” — Winter Safety Campaign

    For several decades, CSEA has sponsored snow closing announcements in nearly every media market in New York; a natural fit because CSEA members are primarily responsible for clearing the roads; providing a necessary service to the community.

    Today, drivers are more distracted, more aggressive and less focused on their driving. They are often talking, texting, or doing something else while driving, putting working men and women at a much higher risk for injury or worse. Just as CSEA works with professional baseball teams to raise awareness with the”Don’t Zone Out”  safety message while spring, summer and fall outdoor road work season is underway, CSEA is now taking the next step in working with our longstanding Hockey partners in a variety of ways to ramp up our message this winter; “Get the Edge on Ice. Slow Down. Be Patient.”

    Hockey partners include the Albany Devils, Binghamton Senators, Rochester Amerks, Elmira Jackals, Utica Comets and Adirondack Flames. We will also be reaching spectators at NY Rangers, NY Islanders and Buffalo Sabres games and reaching spectators through partnerships with college teams like Siena, Cornell, Clarkson and St. Lawrence Hockey.

    Workplace Violence

    Workplace Violence Prevention

    Workplace violence is any physical assault, threatening behavior, or verbal abuse occurring where a public employee performs any work-related duty in the course of his or her employment.

    CSEA has led the fight against workplace violence for many years.  Click here for a brief history of the NYS public employee workplace violence prevention  law.

    The Safety and Health Department has prepared a number of resources and tools to help address the hazard of workplace violence.

     

    General Information on Workplace Violence

    Frequently Asked Questions About the Workplace Violence Prevention Law

    27-b NYS Public Employe Workplace Violence Prevention Law

    Workplace Violence Prevention Regulation

    Short on time?  Read CSEA’s Executive Summary of the Workplace Violence Prevention Regulation.

    or our Workplace Violence Prevention Fact Sheet

    Workplace Violence Prevention DVD, call CSEA Headquarters at (800) 342-4246 and ask to speak to the health and safety department to get a copy of the DVD today!

    Is it time fro a review? Read our Annual Requirements Fact Sheet

    Guidance for Local and Unit Leadership

    Not sure where to begin? Follow this “To Do List for Union Leaders” to get started.

    What does your employer have to do to meet the requirements?  Follow these 7 Steps to comply with the workplace violence prevention regulation.

    Does your employer’s training meet the requirements?  Review the training requirements of the NYS workplace violence prevention regulation to find out.

    If you are unsure if your employer is including authorized employee representatives in all program areas, review all areas of the regulation that require Employee Involvement.

     

    Tools to Help You Address Workplace Violence

    Workplace Examination Check List Public employers are required to complete a workplace examination; they must review and assess many things. Use the workplace examination checklist to make sure your employer has looked at everything.

    Workplace Violence Worker Survey Use the workplace violence survey to get a better understanding of violence at your work site.

    Workplace Violence Inspection Form Use the workplace violence inspection form to help you record your observations if you are looking to do an inspection.

    Focus Group Activity If you are looking to get more information about a specific area or problem, try conducting a workplace violence focus group to get detailed information.

    Incident Report Form To report and record incidents of workplace violence, use the workplace violence incident report form to document what happened.

    Incident Investigation Form In the event that a workplace violence incident occurs, use the workplace violence incident investigation form to get to the root-cause of the incident.

     

    Links and Other Useful Information

    NYS DOL Workplace Violence Page

    OSHA Workplace Violence Page

    NIOSH Workplace Violence Page

    Zika Virus

    Information about Zika

    Zika virus is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito. The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting up to a week, and many people do not have symptoms or will have only mild symptoms. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly and other severe brain defects.Many people infected with Zika virus won’t have symptoms or will only have mild symptoms. The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, conjunctivitis (red eyes), muscle pain and headache. Zika is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week. People usually don’t get sick enough to go to the hospital, and they very rarely die of Zika. For this reason, many people might not realize they have been infected. Symptoms of Zika are similar to other viruses spread through mosquito bites. West Nile Virus is a much more likely virus for New Yorkers to be infected with. Mosquito to person transmission has not yet occurred in New York State, however person to person sexual transmission has occurred in New York.  For workplace settings, OSHA and PESH are treating Zika as a bloodborne pathogen and that standard applies to working around people infected with the Zika virus.  For more information on how your employer should protect you from the potential threat of Zika virus and for personal precautions that can be taken when traveling visit the following websites:

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    CDC Outdoor Worker Factsheet

    A close up of a mosquito